Tuesday, September 6, 2022: 2022 Sharing our Knowledge Conference starts this week in Wrangell

 

Andrew Hope III, speaking at the first Sharing Our Knowledge conference in 1993. Photo by Sergei Kan.

The Sharing Our Knowledge Conference gets underway this week in Wrangell – a gathering that explores the culture, history and languages of Lingít, Haida and Tsimshian tribes and clans.

The first symposium was held almost 30 years ago in Haines, the brainchild of the late Andrew Hope III, who envisioned an exchange of information between tribes, clans, researchers and anyone interested in preserving Alaska Native languages and culture, as well as that of their Canadian relatives.

On  Tuesday’s Juneau Afternoon, a look at some of the history of the Sharing our Knowledge Conference – as well as a preview of this year’s seminars, built around the theme, “A Time for Peace.”

Here’s a link to the agenda:  https://www.sharingourknowledge.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/09/SOK-Wrangell-2022-Agenda.pdf

Here’s the link for the livestream:  https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5JmUC9niijjyB41g-siaQShVH4z4MmsK

Rhonda McBride, Producer of Juneau Afternoon

 

Rhonda McBride hosted Tuesday’s program.  You can catch Juneau Afternoon, Tuesday through Friday, live at 3:00 p.m. on KTOO Juneau 104.3.  The rebroadcast airs at 7:00 p.m. on KTOO. You can also listen online at ktoo.org.

For more information about Juneau Afternoon or to schedule time on the show, email juneauafternoon@ktoo.org. Please schedule early. The show is often booked one to two weeks in advance.

 

 

 

Listen to the program: Sharing Our Knowledge Conference highlights.

Guests: Organizers for Sharing Our Knowledge Conference: Joaqlin Estus, Peter Metcalfe, Jim LaBelle and Meda DeWitt
 

The Wrangell Institute was a boarding school for Alaska Native students that operated from 1932 to 1975 (Photo courtesy of Sharing Our Knowledge Conference).

 

The theme for this year’s gathering is “A Time for Peace.”  One day of the gathering is devoted to the Native boarding school experience, led by Jim LaBelle, a boarding school survivor from Wrangell. LaBelle is currently vice president of the National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition working to address boarding school trauma. LaBelle and other conference organizers believe peace and healing come from knowing the truth about the past and reclaiming cultural knowledge.

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