ACLU of Alaska and Dunleavy for Alaska file lawsuit challenging state road advertising ban

This photo of a Dunleavy for Alaska sign on Palmer resident Eric Siebels' property is included in a lawsuit challenging the state ban on advertising near highways. Siebels joined the lawsuit with the ACLU of Alaska and Dunleavy for Alaska, an independent expenditure group supporting Mike Dunleavy. (Photo included in lawsuit)
This photo of a Dunleavy for Alaska sign on Palmer resident Eric Siebels’ property is included in a lawsuit challenging the state ban on advertising near highways. Siebels joined the lawsuit with the ACLU of Alaska and Dunleavy for Alaska, an independent expenditure group supporting Mike Dunleavy. The  (Photo courtesy Eric Siebels)

The American Civil Liberties Union of Alaska and a group supporting Mike Dunleavy for governor filed a lawsuit Thursday challenging a state ban on advertising along highways. The lawsuit follows the state Department of Transportation recently removing political signs.

Alaska has had a prohibition on advertising along state highways since 1949 when it was a territory. There are a few exceptions, including for scenic attractions.

The law bars all advertising within 660 feet of a highway, including interstates and other state-designated roads. The prohibition includes both public and private property.

Andrew Kitchenman

State Government Reporter, Alaska Public Media & KTOO

State government plays an outsized role in the life of Alaskans. As the state continues to go through the painful process of deciding what its priorities are, I bring Alaskans to the scene of a government in transition.

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