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First winter snowfall breaks Juneau records

First winter snowfall breaks Juneau recordsMore than 8 inches of snow fell at Juneau International Airport on Sunday.

Snow-starved Alaska not the normal state

Snow-starved Alaska not the normal stateDuring the first 21 days of November 2014, no recordable snow fell in Anchorage, Juneau or Fairbanks.

Villager’s remains lead to 1918 flu breakthrough

Villager’s remains lead to 1918 flu breakthroughThe revival of the virus responsible for the 1918 Spanish flu, the killer of millions of people, was the end of a long journey for Johan Hultin.

ANSEP tripling enrollment in middle school program

ANSEP tripling enrollment in middle school programThe Alaska Native Science & Engineering Program's free Middle School Academies never had enough slots for interested students.

Video: Virtual reality via Google Cardboard

Video: Virtual reality via Google CardboardIvan Hazelton explains why he's got goggles made of cardboard strapped to his face.

Report: Subsidized logging costs feds millions

Report: Subsidized logging costs feds millionsA new report says the Forest Service is wasting millions of dollars by propping up a failing Southeast Alaska timber industry.

Short earthquake rolls through Juneau

Short earthquake rolls through JuneauMagnitude 4.58 temblor occurred at 7:03 a.m. Wednesday

A green way to deal with carbon dioxide

A green way to deal with carbon dioxideLast week, I wrote about a thought experiment proposed by Fairbanks scientist Jim Beget. He suggests raining down crystals of a compound that captures carbon dioxide onto a frigid plateau in Antarctica.

Why Alaska researchers want to use drones to find hibernating bears

Why Alaska researchers want to use drones to find hibernating bearsFor the first time, Alaska researchers plan to use drones with thermal cameras to detect hibernating polar bears and grizzly bears on the North Slope.

A cool idea for locking up carbon dioxide

A cool idea for locking up carbon dioxideJim Beget spends much of his time digging for clues from long ago, like when a volcanic island might have collapsed into the sea, sending giant waves to distant shores.