Sitka flights reduced during runway repair

An Alaska 737-800 on approach to the Sitka Airport.

An Alaska 737-800 on approach to the Sitka Airport. (Photo by Jonathan Caves/Flickr Creative Commons)

Sitka will miss two Alaska Airlines flights a day during the month of May, in order to allow a paving contractor to replace the runway at the Rocky Gutierrez Airport.

Flight 70, which arrives from Juneau at around 11 PM every night, and Flight 73, which departs at 6 AM the next morning with the same plane, have been suspended as of this week, and will resume sometime around Memorial Day weekend.Only the airport terminal building is the property of Sitka. The airport runway, taxi areas, and ramp are owned and maintained by the state Department of Transportation.

DOT spokesman Jeremy Woodrow says May has the right combination of decent weather and lighter traffic to accommodate the work.

“The overlay is basically asphalt on the runway. The reason there’s a nighttime closure, and the reason it’s delaying the Alaska Airlines flight is that the construction company needs a long enough window to be able to pave the runway and then allow it to set.”

The contractor has been on site since April, hauling gravel and setting up paving equipment. Woodrow says work will begin each evening following the departure of Flight 67 at about 6:20 PM.

 

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Sitka flights reduced during runway repair

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