Gardentalk – Season finale on fall clean up of yard and garden, bringing in perennials

By October 12, 2018 Food, Gardentalk, Outdoors
Homegrown onions, cucumbers, peppers, and mushrooms get pickled in a North Douglas kitchen.

Homegrown onions, cucumbers, peppers, and mushrooms get pickled in a North Douglas kitchen. (Photo by Matt Miller)

In the final edition of Gardentalk for the 2018 season, Master Gardener Ed Buyarski recommends clearing our garden of harvested and dying plants that will provide a good habitat for slugs laying eggs this fall.

Horse manure, seaweed, and the tops of almost all dead and dying plants can go into the compost pile, except for cabbage family roots, which may be infested with root maggots.

Add some fresh compost or another soil amendment to your freshly cleaned garden beds and then cover with tarps or plastic. That will protect the soil from the fall rains and allow worms and beneficial microorganisms to grow and thrive.

“So, in the springtime whenever the days start getting longer, we can start gardening a few weeks earlier,” Buyarski said.

Listen to the October 11 edition of Gardentalk:

And, don’t forget to bring in your begonias, dahlias and fuchsias from outside and store them in a dark, dry place like a root cellar or corner of the garage. Be sure to check the fuchsias on a regular basis throughout the winter so that they don’t dry out. They may need a few waterings over the winter to keep the roots from getting too dry.

Finally, everyone is invited to bring a recipe or dish to the annual Garlic Lovers Potluck at the Canvass, Oct. 21 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m.

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