Gardentalk – Greenhouse tomatoes

Flowers are just starting to blossom on these tomato plants in a North Douglas greenhouse. But even with grow lights, it's unlikely these plants will provide much fruit before the end of the season. Some of the branches and leaves also need to be thinned out to allow for more sunlight. (Photo by Matt Miller/KTOO)
Flowers are just starting to blossom on these tomato plants in a North Douglas greenhouse. But even with grow lights, it’s unlikely these plants will provide much fruit before the end of the season. Leaves also need to be thinned out to allow for more sunlight. (Photo by Matt Miller/KTOO)

It’s nearing the end of the season for greenhouse tomatoes. Master gardener Ed Buyarski recommends trimming new tomato flowers so that any existing fruit can mature and ripen.

“I’m pretty sure that those blooms that are on there now are not likely to set fruit and ripen fruit with conditions we have,” Buyarski says. “So, I’m clipping the growing tips off. And that way, the plant is going to push its energy into ripening all of the green tomatoes that are already on the plant.”

Trimming some of the branches and leaves to allow more sunlight into the greenhouse will also help the ripening process.

“More sun translates into better color, better sugars, and better flavor in the fruit,” Buyarski says.

Listen to the Gardentalk segment that aired Sept. 3 on KTOO’s Morning Edition:

Ed Buyarski's tomatoes as they were featured on Sept. 3 edition of Gardentalk, just before they were consumed. (Photo by Matt Miller/KTOO)
Ed Buyarski’s tomatoes as featured on Sept. 3 edition of Gardentalk, just before they were consumed. (Photo by Matt Miller/KTOO)
Site notifications
Update notification options
Subscribe to notifications