‘It’s Not Just About The President’: Tracing Trump’s Contacts

President Donald J. Trump and First Lady Melania Trump stand as TAPS is played during the annual 9/11 Observance Ceremony in Washington D.C., Sept. 11, 2019. (DoD Photo by U.S. Army Sgt. James K. McCann)
President Donald J. Trump and First Lady Melania Trump stand as TAPS is played during the annual 9/11 Observance Ceremony in Washington D.C., Sept. 11, 2019. (Photo courtesy Department of Defense/ U.S. Army Sgt. James K. McCann)

With President Trump’s announcement early Friday that he and the first lady have tested positive for the coronavirus, much of the focus inside the White House will likely turn to contact tracing.

In the past week alone, Trump has held rallies in Virginia, Pennsylvania and Minnesota; welcomed his Supreme Court nominee to the White House; and, of course, traveled to Ohio for Tuesday’s presidential debate. Along the way, he came into close contact with countless White House officials and supporters.

It’s a situation that Dr. Ashish Jha, dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, calls a “nightmare.”

White House personnel will have to race to identify anyone who came into contact with the president, said Jha, who noted that the traditional metric used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to gauge close contact is anyone who was within six feet for 15 minutes.

“Anybody who was on the airplane with him, anybody who’s been in the White House with him, somebody who attended a rally who was, you know, 100 yards away, doesn’t need to worry,” Jha said. “But anybody who was in close contact with him for any extended period of time needs to be identified and quarantined and probably tested.”

Vice President Mike Pence has already tested negative for the coronavirus, as has Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, the president’s daughter and adviser Ivanka Trump and husband Jared Kushner, who serves as a senior adviser.Former Vice President and Democratic nominee Joe Biden said he has tested negative for coronavirus as well.

Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett has also tested negative for coronavirus. In a statement, White House spokesman Judd Deere said Barrett is tested daily for the coronavirus and was last with the president on the day she was nominated.

The White House has said the president and first lady are experiencing “mild symptoms” and that they are expected to remain at the White House for the next two weeks.

“He should absolutely be in isolation. He should not be seeing really anybody else,” Jha said. “As we saw with [British] Prime Minister [Boris] Johnson, it can take, you know, five, 10 days before the real severe symptoms come on. So we’re going to hope that this goes smoothly. But I’m worried about the next week ahead.”

This is a breaking news story that will be updated. 

NPR News

KTOO is the NPR member station in Juneau. NPR offers its members radio and digital stories.

Like what you just read? KTOO news stories are member supported. Support your community news source today. Donate to KTOO.
Site notifications
Update notification options
Subscribe to notifications