The ladder and the hose are essential tools of any firefighter. As part of Fire Ops 101 at the Hagevig Fire Training Center in Juneau, participants climbed a 75-foot ladder apparatus while wearing turnout gear and SCBA, and they learned the basics of operating a hose for defensive fire operations.

 

Training begins at Hagevig Regional Fire Training Center on Saturday, Feb. 1, 2013. Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO

Training begins at Hagevig Regional Fire Training Center on Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014. (Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO)

KTOO reporter Matt Miller climbs the ladder during the morning training at Hagevig Fire Training Center. Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO

KTOO reporter Matt Miller climbs the ladder during the morning training at Hagevig Fire Training Center. (Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO)

Firefighters will routinely climb onto a roof during a building fire to ventilate the structure of heat and smoke. But CCF/R’s Erik Goldsberry says the various antenna, masts, ventilation hoods and air handling ducts, and other equipment can all be hazards, obstacles, and possible soft spots in a collapsing roof.

“We pre-fire plan a lot of our target hazards in town. So, a building like (Alaska State Trooper post on Sherwood Lane), we try to hit annually. We try to walk around and see if there’s been any changes in the building.”

Goldsberry says they try to update their floor plans for every major building in Juneau for locations of offices, roof access, electrical service, and fuel storage.

“We like to know where all that stuff is so we can shut the fuel off if we need to, or know that could be a potential hazard to catch fire.”

KTOO reporter Matt Miller climbs to the top of the ladder with his "shadow" firefighter Erik Goldsberry. Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO

KTOO reporter Matt Miller climbs to the top of the ladder with his “shadow” firefighter Erik Goldsberry. (Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO)

Juneau Empire reporter Emily Russo Miller climbs to the top of the ladder at the Hagevig Fire Training Center. Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO

Juneau Empire reporter Emily Russo Miller climbs to the top of the ladder at the Hagevig Fire Training Center. (Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO)

Juneau Assembly member Kate Troll talks to her "shadow" firefighter Joe Mishler after climbing the ladder to the top of the building. Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO

Juneau Assembly member Kate Troll talks to her “shadow” firefighter Joe Mishler after climbing the ladder to the top of the building. (Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO)

Exposure or Defensive Hose Operations

An exposure line for defensive fire operations would normally be operated by firefighters if there is a danger to surrounding buildings during a structure fire.

“Think about how you’re sitting there,” Goldsberry says, “And you could be there for hours.”

KTOO reporter Matt Miller learns how to operate a fire hose from his "shadow" firefighter Erik Goldsberry at Hagevig Fire Training Center. Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO

KTOO reporter Matt Miller learns how to operate a fire hose from his “shadow” firefighter Erik Goldsberry at Hagevig Fire Training Center.(Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO)

“It could be a nice job because you could be the guy who just did entry. You could’ve just been through a tank of air. So, you come out. You’re exhausted. You take the pack off. You get a little bit of recovery, and something to drink and some rest. Then you go back to staging and the IC (Incident Commander) says ‘We need an exposure line’. You could do that. This is a good way to recover after expending yourself.”