Elders And Youth Conference takes a look at healing with film ‘We Breathe Again’

Keggulluk Earl Polk is featured in "We Breathe Again," a documentary that follows four Alaska Natives on their path through the healing process. Polk attended a screening of the film in Bethel in September. (Photo by Christine Trudeau/KYUK)

Keggulluk Earl Polk is featured in “We Breathe Again,” a documentary that follows four Alaska Natives on their path through the healing process. Polk attended a screening of the film in Bethel in September. (Photo by Christine Trudeau/KYUK)

Native communities across Alaska are seeking a key to understanding the epidemic of suicide.

The film screened Tuesday last week during the First Alaskans Institute 2017 Elders and Youth Conference.

It was a prominent theme at the conference held prior to the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention in Anchorage last week

“Part Land, Part Water – Always Native” was the theme, and much of the Conference focused on healing cultural trauma by reconnecting to traditional knowledge and values.

One documentary takes viewers on a journey to finding that connection again.

Keggulluk Earl Polk is featured in “We Breathe Again,” a documentary that follows four Alaska Natives on their path through the healing process.

“Sing. Go back to your roots. Dig deep. Hit your knees, become humble,” Polk said. “Realize that you’re stronger than what it is that’s trying to take you away, and the only reason you’re strong is because you’re weak enough to ask for help.”

A traditional Yup’ik teacher, Polk has traveled all over Alaska as a speaker and host to many culturally based youth programs.

He currently works as a senior psychiatric technician at the McCann Treatment Center in Bethel.

The film’s producer Evon Peter hopes that the broader Native community will see the film as a valuable tool.

“It can be used as a teaching and healing tool to help open conversations at the community level,” Peter said.

So far, health care providers have contacted Peter and filmmakers to use the film as a teaching tool in training their staff members.

“Saying, ‘Wow. Can we use this as a tool for new orientation for medical staff that are coming into our communities and our organizations?’” Peter said. “Because it really sheds some light in a positive way that I think can help people to understand that we can navigate through challenging moments in our life, and that we can build a strong foundation under us again.”

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