Travel ban legal battles continue, as administration appeals new injunction

The Trump administration is appealing a federal judge’s decision to temporarily block the president’s second travel ban from going into effect — setting up another legal showdown in an appeals court.

The first version of the ban, temporarily suspending the U.S. refugee program and barring entry into the U.S. from residents of seven majority-Muslim countries, was quickly blocked by a federal judge in Washington state. The Justice Department appealed that temporary restraining order, but a panel of judges from the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the suspension of the ban.

Then President Donald Trump issued a new ban — one designed to address the legal concerns of the 9th Circuit, the administration says. It omitted Iraq from the list of barred countries, removed references to religion and excluded green card holders and people who already had visas, among other changes.

That new executive order was also swiftly challenged in court. Earlier this week, two federal judges in separate courts blocked portions of the ban — a judge in Hawaii imposed a temporary restraining order, and a judge in Maryland granted a narrower, but potentially longer-lasting, preliminary injunction.

It’s the Maryland injunction that the Trump administration is moving to appeal, asking the 4th Circuit Court to intervene.

Omar Jadwat, the director of the ACLU’s Immigrants’ Rights Project and one of the lawyers representing the plaintiffs in the Maryland case, says the ban has “fared miserably in the courts.”

“We look forward to defending this careful and well-reasoned decision in the appeals court,” he says, referring to Judge Theodore D. Chuang’s decision to grant the preliminary injunction.

The Trump administration had signaled on Thursday that it planned to appeal Chuang’s decision; press secretary Sean Spicer said the administration would seek clarification on the Hawaii ruling before appealing that case.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Recent headlines

  • Cash Money

    Walker pitches 1.5 percent income tax with a limit

    Administration officials have a mouthful of a name for it: the “capped hybrid head tax.” It's a flat 1.5 percent of wages and self-employment income, with a maximum of twice the value of that year's Alaska Permanent Fund dividend.
  • A Tongass National Forest clearcut is shown in this 2014 aerial view. A new court decision limits logging on roadless areas of the forest. (Photo by Ed Schoenfeld/CoastAlaska News)

    Federal court upholds contentious ‘roadless rule’ for national forests

    A federal district court has sided with conservationists fighting to preserve the U.S. Forest Service's "roadless rule" that limits road building in national forests. Alaska conservationists opposed to expanded logging in Tongass National Forest hailed the ruling as a victory.
  • McCain announces opposition to Obamacare repeal bill, possibly dooming it

    Arizona Sen. John McCain is the second Republican to oppose the legislation, after Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul came out against it last week. If one more GOP senator is against the bill, it cannot pass.
  • Master Gardener Ed Buyarski harvested these potatoes of the Caribe and Magic Molly varieties which suffered from potato scab. (Photo by Matt Miller/KTOO)

    Gardentalk – Scabby potatoes

    Peel off the scab and eat the potatoes immediately. They won't keep very well in your root cellar. Master Gardener Ed Buyarski also has tips for mitigating potato scab, how to carefully harvest potatoes, techniques to harden or age potatoes before harvest, and setting aside small seed potatoes for next season's planting.
X