Congress approves commission on Native American children

President Barack Obama delivers a health care address to a joint session of Congress at the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., Sept. 9, 2009. (Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson)   This official White House photograph is being made available only for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photograph. The photograph may not be manipulated in any way and may not be used in commercial or political materials, advertisements, emails, products, promotions that in any way suggests approval or endorsement of the President, the First Family, or the White House.
President Barack Obama delivers a health care address to a joint session of Congress at the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., Sept. 9, 2009. (Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson)

Congress unanimously adopted legislation to create a Commission on Native American children Tuesday.

The 11-member commission will study and develop recommendations on ways to combine and coordinate federal programs and funding for Alaska Native, American Indian, and Native Hawaiian children.

The commission is named in honor of Dr. Walter Soboleff, a Tlingit elder from Southeast Alaska who promoted cultural education, and a Lower 48 tribal leader, Alyce Spotted Bear.

Sen Lisa Murkowski said, “Walter Soboleff lived his life by a simple motto: ‘Take care of the old person you are to become,’ but that must begin as early as possible.”

She says the aim is to more effectively address issues affecting Native children, such as poverty, abuse and domestic violence and substance abuse.

 

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