Slipping Through The City: Bristol Turns Street Into A Water Slide

Summer hasn’t officially begun. But that isn’t stopping the city of Bristol, England, from closing off traffic so people can ride a nearly 300-foot-long water slide down the street.

Called the Park and Slide, the one-day attraction is the work of artist Luke Jerram, who tells the BBC that he was inspired by old photos of children playing in city streets.

“If you look at photographs in the 1900s you see these beautiful empty streets with all the kids playing out,” Jerram tells the BBC. “It’s an extraordinary thing and all that has been taken away.”

It returned today in Bristol, where the city’s steep Park Street provided the venue for Sunday’s event. Hundreds lined the course to watch.

More than 96,000 people entered a lottery for a chance to slip down the Park and Slide; only 360 got their wish. The slide uses a mixture of water and dish soap to give riders a bit more speed as they slide on an inflatable raft.

In case you’re wondering what it costs to slide: The rides were free (and organizers promised to cancel any ticket found to have been sold). Built of hay bales and tarpaulins, the project received backing from an online funding drive after organizers rejected offers of corporate sponsorship.

Bristol plans to hold similar events on the first Sunday of every month this summer.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.image
Read original article – Published May 04, 201411:42 AM ET
Slipping Through The City: Bristol Turns Street Into A Water Slide

Recent headlines

  • Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney. (Photo courtesy Whitehouse.gov)

    3 things for Alaskans to know about Trump’s budget

    President Trump is proposing to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling. That’s one detail from the budget the White House delivered to Congress Tuesday. The document fleshes out the “blueprint” released in March.
  • Regulators to hold hearing in Juneau over garbage contract transfer

    Juneau residents will have a rare opportunity this week to sound off over trash service. The company that runs curbside pick up has been acquired by Waste Connections, a Canada-based business with customers in 39 states and five provinces.
  • A few of the couple thousand walrus hauled out at Cape Grieg north of Ugashik Bay in June 2016. Alaska Department of Fish and Game and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service say the walrus are back this year, but have not said yet how many. (Photo by KDLG)

    Cape Greig walrus are back; Fish and Game plans change fishery boundary again

    The Department of Fish and Game will pull the north line of the Ugashik District back away from the haulout site again, Salomone said, the same as last year. The exact coordinates will be published with the first announcement from Fish and Game about June 1.
  • Navy to scan Kodiak waters for WWII explosives

    The Navy will scan Kodiak and Unalaska waters for World War II-era munitions using underwater drones next month, as part of an ongoing effort to eventually remove the explosives. What could happen and whether the historic weapons would detonate is unclear.
X