Fresh Avalanches On Everest Appear To End Climbs In Nepal

A Nepalese government delegation met with Sherpa mountain guides near Mount Everest's base camp on the south side of the mountain Thursday. The government was hoping to convince the guides to continue working even though 16 Sherpas had died a week earlier. But fresh ice avalanches on Friday appear to have doomed Nepal's climbing season. (Adrian Ballinger/Alpenglow Expeditions/AP)

A Nepalese government delegation met with Sherpa mountain guides near Mount Everest’s base camp on the south side of the mountain Thursday. The government was hoping to convince the guides to continue working even though 16 Sherpas had died a week earlier. But fresh ice avalanches on Friday appear to have doomed Nepal’s climbing season. (Adrian Ballinger/Alpenglow Expeditions/AP)

High up on the Nepalese side of Mount Everest, fresh ice avalanches on Friday made it “almost certain that no one will summit the world’s highest mountain from Nepal during this year’s climbing season,” Reuters writes.

The ice did not injure anyone. But it came crashing through the same area where 16 Sherpa guides died one week ago in an avalanche — the single deadliest day ever known on Everest. In the week since, many of the remaining 400 or so Sherpas have been saying they do not want to climb this year, both out of respect for those who were killed and because they want more insurance and other benefits for their families. NPR’s Julie McCarthy detailed the Sherpas’ grievances this week on Morning Edition.

Thursday, Nepalese government officials met with Sherpas on Everest to try to convince them to continue working for the foreign expeditions that have paid tens of thousands of dollars, or more, to climb the mountain.

But on Friday, mountaineer Alan Arnette wrote on the website where he tracks activity on Everest that “teams are leaving — it’s over for all. Time to mourn and regroup.” On Twitter, he compared the situation on Everest to “an airport with [the] terminal open but runways closed.”

While there may be no summit attempts during the April-May climbing season from the Nepalese side of the mountain, National Geographic points out that:

“The northern, Chinese side of the mountain remains open for business. On Thursday, between 50 and 100 climbers were continuing their methodical ascent toward the summit from the north.”

The north side has been less popular with climbers in recent decades, National Geographic adds, because the Chinese government has at times banned expeditions. The south side, though, requires expeditions to pass through the treacherous Khumbu icefall — the site of last week’s tragedy.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.image

Read original article – Published April 25, 2014 8:15 AM ET
Fresh Avalanches On Everest Appear To End Climbs In Nepal

Recent headlines

  • dollar bill money macro

    Per diems driving special session costs

    Lawmakers who represent areas outside Juneau receive $295 for each day of the special session. Juneau lawmakers receive $221.25 per day.
  • Caroline Hoover proudly pins an Alaska Territorial Guard medal on the front of her father's parka during an official discharge ceremony held Oct. 17 in Kipnuk, Alaska. David Martin is one of three surviving members of the Alaska Territorial Guard's Kipnuk unit. A total of 59 residents of Kipnuk, who volunteered to defend Alaska in the event of a Japanese invasion during World War II, were recognized during the ceremony. Kipnuk residents who served with the Alaska Territorial Guard from 1942-1947 were members of a U.S. Army component organized in response to attacks by the Japanese on Pearl Harbor. (Photo by Jerry Walton, Department of Military and Veterans Affairs cultural resource manager and native liaison/public domain/Wikimedia Commons)

    16 Alaska Territorial Guard vets to be honored in Anchorage

    Sixteen veterans of the Alaska Territorial Guard will be honored at a discharge ceremony today. Four of them are from Western Alaska.
  • Don Andrew Roguska looks out from an upstairs window of an historic Juneau house he bought in 2016 to restore. Zoning regulations have prevented him from rebuilding in the same style. (Photo by Jacob Resneck/KTOO)

    Juneau mulls relaxing zoning rules for historic houses

    The historic houses in Juneau and Douglas were predominately built by miners and fishermen long before today's zoning was put into place. That's prevented homeowners from restoring or rebuilding homes in these neighborhoods without running into conflict with the city's zoning laws -- a temporary fix may be on the way.
  • Young joins Afghanistan war skeptics in Congress

    Alaska U.S. Rep. Don Young wants to know why Americans are still fighting in Afghanistan. He has co-sponsored a bill that would end funding for the war in a year, unless the president and Congress affirm the need for it.
X