Tech Companies Release Details On Surveillance Data

An employee stands at the Microsoft booth during the 2013 Computex in Taipei on June 4, 2013. Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images

An employee stands at the Microsoft booth during the 2013 Computex in Taipei on June 4, 2013. Mandy Cheng/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook, Microsoft, Google and LinkedIn released updated details on the number of times the U.S. government asked the companies to turn over information about its users.

If you remember, the tech companies filed suit against the U.S., claiming that the government was violating their right to free speech, when it told them they could not reveal details about the information they’re being asked to provide. The government had argued that the companies couldn’t even make public the number of requests the companies receive each year. In late January, the U.S. and the tech companies agreed to rules on what and when they could release.

Conforming to that agreement, today the tech companies released the data in ranges.

For example, Google said that during the period between July to December of 2012, it received 0 to 999 requests for content that were approved by the secret Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. That request affected 12,000 to 12,999 accounts.

Another example: During the time period of January 1 through June 30, 2013, Facebook received 0 to 999 FISA content requests, which affected 5,000 to 5,999 users. During that same period, the FBI issued 0 to 999 national security letters, which are requests for metadata that are not approved by the FISC and come with a gag order.

One more example: During the time period of January 1 to June 30, 2013, Yahoo received 0 to 999 FISC-approved requests for content, which affected 30,000 to 30,999 accounts.

While these numbers seem large, Yahoo writes: “the number of Yahoo accounts specified in global government data requests comprised less than one one-hundredth of one percent (<.01%) of our worldwide user base for the reporting period.”

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.image
Read original article – Published February 03, 2014 6:35 PM
Tech Companies Release Details On Surveillance Data

Recent headlines

  • Cameron Brockett and Taylor Vidic of The Quaintrelles perform their song "Rolling Stone" live at the Alaskan Hotel during the 2017 Alaska Folk Folk Festival. (Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO) Cameron Brockett and Taylor Vidic of The Quaintrelles perform their song "Rolling Stone" live at the Alaskan Hotel during the 2017 Alaska Folk Folk Festival. (Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO)

    Red Carpet Concert: The Quaintrelles

    Juneau musicians Taylor Vidic and Cameron Brockett perform their song "Rolling Stone" during the Alaska Folk Fest Red Carpet Concert
  • 220 Anchorage teachers receive layoff notices

    The pink slips, in all 220, were issued as legislators contend with a $2.5 billion budget deficit, leaving education funding levels for the coming year uncertain.
  • GCI Antenna

    Many GCI customers will see internet bills go up

    Many customers of Alaska telecommunications company GCI will see the cost of their internet service increase next month. Rates for what GCI calls its “No Worries” plan will increase 7 percent to 12 percent. That’s roughly $5 to $10 a month.
  • NTSB investigating helicopter crash on Herbert Glacier

    The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating how and why a Juneau-bound helicopter ferrying tourists crashed during a glacier excursion. The pilot and six tourists were treated and released at Juneau's hospital with minor injuries.
X