Supreme Court Halts Gay Marriages In Utah

Ruth Hackford-Peer, right, and Kim Hackford-Peer are married by Rev. Curtis Price, while hugging their two children in the lobby of the Salt Lake County Clerk's Office on Dec. 20. Kim Raff/AP

Ruth Hackford-Peer, right, and Kim Hackford-Peer are married by Rev. Curtis Price, while hugging their two children in the lobby of the Salt Lake County Clerk’s Office on Dec. 20. Kim Raff/AP

The United States Supreme Court has put same-sex marriages on hold in the state of Utah.

The order issued by the court on Monday halts same-sex marriages until an appeal is decided by the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit.

If you remember, U.S. District Judge Robert J. Shelby struck down Utah’s constitutional ban on gay marriage on Dec. 20, saying it irrationally demeans the dignity of same-sex couples. Since then, Utah has sought a stay of that ruling, while it appeals the decision with a higher court.

After Shelby and then Tenth Circuit Court denied Utah’s request for a stay, the state asked the Supreme Court to step in. They have now ruled in favor of Utah, halting any new marriages in the state.

Update at 10:54 a.m. ET. Support Of The Full Court?

The short order says that Justice Sonia Sotomayor referred the request to the full court.

As Lyle Denniston of SCOTUSblog notes, that seems to mean that the stay has the support of the full court because the order does not note any dissent.

Lyle goes on:

“The ruling can be interpreted as an indication that the Court wants to have further exploration in lower courts of the basic constitutional question of state power to limit marriage to a man and a woman. Had it refused the state’s request for delay, that would have at least left the impression that the Court was comfortable allowing same-sex marriages to go forward in the 33 states where they are still banned.”

The order, by the way, does not give any reasoning for the decision. As we reported, Utah argued that allowing marriages, while an appeal is in process, would lead to confusion.

If Shelby’s ruling was eventually overturned, the state argued, it would leave same-sex couples who married in Utah under a “cloud of uncertainty.”

On CNN, legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin said it’s still unclear what the status of the marriages already performed is now.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.image
Read original article – Published January 06, 201410:41 AM
Supreme Court Halts Gay Marriages In Utah

Recent headlines

  • dollar bill money macro

    Per diems driving special session costs

    Lawmakers who represent areas outside Juneau receive $295 for each day of the special session. Juneau lawmakers receive $221.25 per day.
  • Caroline Hoover proudly pins an Alaska Territorial Guard medal on the front of her father's parka during an official discharge ceremony held Oct. 17 in Kipnuk, Alaska. David Martin is one of three surviving members of the Alaska Territorial Guard's Kipnuk unit. A total of 59 residents of Kipnuk, who volunteered to defend Alaska in the event of a Japanese invasion during World War II, were recognized during the ceremony. Kipnuk residents who served with the Alaska Territorial Guard from 1942-1947 were members of a U.S. Army component organized in response to attacks by the Japanese on Pearl Harbor. (Photo by Jerry Walton, Department of Military and Veterans Affairs cultural resource manager and native liaison/public domain/Wikimedia Commons)

    16 Alaska Territorial Guard vets to be honored in Anchorage

    Sixteen veterans of the Alaska Territorial Guard will be honored at a discharge ceremony today. Four of them are from Western Alaska.
  • Don Andrew Roguska looks out from an upstairs window of an historic Juneau house he bought in 2016 to restore. Zoning regulations have prevented him from rebuilding in the same style. (Photo by Jacob Resneck/KTOO)

    Juneau mulls relaxing zoning rules for historic houses

    The historic houses in Juneau and Douglas were predominately built by miners and fishermen long before today's zoning was put into place. That's prevented homeowners from restoring or rebuilding homes in these neighborhoods without running into conflict with the city's zoning laws -- a temporary fix may be on the way.
  • Young joins Afghanistan war skeptics in Congress

    Alaska U.S. Rep. Don Young wants to know why Americans are still fighting in Afghanistan. He has co-sponsored a bill that would end funding for the war in a year, unless the president and Congress affirm the need for it.
X