Fisheries group sets legislative priorities

A major commercial fishing organization is pushing for more funding to put seafood on school lunch tables.

The United Fishermen of Alaska’s Board of Directors set that as a priority during its recent meeting in Sitka.

UFA Executive Director Julianne Curry says it’s part of a larger program that sends a variety of Alaska-grown products to schools.

“The overall priority is looking for ways to be able to promote not only Alaska-produced products, but also seafood to Alaskans. Getting seafood into the schools in Alaska is a big priority for a lot of our school districts and we’re looking for any way that we can that supports any program that works,” Curry says.

She says the organization will lobby the Legislature to make funding a regular part of the state budget.

UFA President Jerry McCune says the board will also advocate for continued funding for important state agencies.

“We’re always looking to keep Fish and Game’s budget at least up some or status quo. Because it’s costing more and more and we’re losing a lot of the older folks that know a lot about the department right now,” he says.

UFA is also looking at appropriations for hatcheries and the fight against invasive species.

Curry says it may also propose changes to the state panel fishermen deal with most.

“Something that we are actively seeking to improve is the board of fish process itself and look and see if there are any efficiencies that can be gained. And make sure that we are adequately considering the input from the public and that the meetings are accessible and that we’re really getting the best input that we possibly can,” Curry says.

The United Fishermen of Alaska is an umbrella organization of about 35 commercial fishing and processing groups.

The Legislature begins its 2014 meetings on January 21st. It’s the second year of the 28th legislative session, so bills proposed last year are still in play.

Recent headlines

  • Cameron Brockett and Taylor Vidic of The Quaintrelles perform their song "Rolling Stone" live at the Alaskan Hotel during the 2017 Alaska Folk Folk Festival. (Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO) Cameron Brockett and Taylor Vidic of The Quaintrelles perform their song "Rolling Stone" live at the Alaskan Hotel during the 2017 Alaska Folk Folk Festival. (Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO)

    Red Carpet Concert: The Quaintrelles

    Juneau musicians Taylor Vidic and Cameron Brockett perform their song "Rolling Stone" during the Alaska Folk Fest Red Carpet Concert
  • 220 Anchorage teachers receive layoff notices

    The pink slips, in all 220, were issued as legislators contend with a $2.5 billion budget deficit, leaving education funding levels for the coming year uncertain.
  • GCI Antenna

    Many GCI customers will see internet bills go up

    Many customers of Alaska telecommunications company GCI will see the cost of their internet service increase next month. Rates for what GCI calls its “No Worries” plan will increase 7 percent to 12 percent. That’s roughly $5 to $10 a month.
  • NTSB investigating helicopter crash on Herbert Glacier

    The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating how and why a Juneau-bound helicopter ferrying tourists crashed during a glacier excursion. The pilot and six tourists were treated and released at Juneau's hospital with minor injuries.
X