Government Shutdown Delays Rocket Launch

By October 23, 2013NPR News
A Minotaur I at Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. NASA

A Minotaur I at Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia. NASA

The launch of a rocket carrying a record-breaking 29 satellites — originally set for early next month — will be delayed by a few weeks after the partial government shutdown halted preparations

The Minotaur 1, operated by private space-launch firm Orbital Sciences Corp. had been slated for blast off from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia on Nov. 4. Space.com reports:

“But just as preparations began to ramp up for the launch, managers had to order a work stoppage Oct. 1 because the government shutdown interrupted access to facilities on NASA property, including a satellite processing building, a rocket storage complex and the launch pad.”

The launch of the Minotaur 1, which Space.com describes as “a fusion of decommissioned Minuteman missile stages and new commercial solid rocket motors,” has been tentatively rescheduled for Nov. 19. Space.com says:

“The Minotaur 1 rocket will launch 29 satellites into low Earth orbit, setting a new record for the most payloads ever deployed from a single rocket.

The largest payload is a technology trailblazer named STPSat 3, an approximately 400-pound spacecraft hosting five experiments to test next-generation satellite components and measure the space environment.

Four dozen more satellites will launch stowed inside CubeSat deployment pods for release once the Minotaur’s upper stage reaches orbit.”

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.
Read original article – Published October 21, 2013 5:18 PM
Government Shutdown Delays Rocket Launch

Recent headlines

  • An Alaska Airlines plane at Juneau International Airport.

    Alaska Airlines pilots plan picket over lack of compensation

    Alaska Airlines pilots have reached a breaking point in negotiations with the company, and now have plans to picket outside Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport. The pilots plan to picket starting at 1 p.m. Monday outside the airport in Anchorage.
  • Obadiah Jenkins tries to help Daniel Hartung pull himself from Six-Mile Creek in Hope. (Photo courtesy James Bennett)

    Homer resident saves kayaker’s life on Six-Mile Creek

    Jenkins was taking a practice run through the class four rapids when a bystander filming the event, noticed another participant, Daniel Hartung, 64, of Indian Valley, flipped out of his kayak and became pinned under a log.
  • Vigor Alaska Shipyard Development director Doug Ward talks with Marine Transportation advisory board member Greg Wakefield inside the not-quite-finished Alaska Class ferry Tazlina. (Photo by Leila Kheiry/KRBD)

    Alaska class ferry Tazlina on track at Ketchikan shipyard

    The Tazlina is the first of two new Alaska Class ferries that the Ketchikan Vigor Alaska shipyard is building for the state. Its two halves are complete and welded together, and shipyard workers are busy getting interior spaces done.
  • The Matanuska sits in drydock for maintenance.

    Fall-winter-spring ferry bookings begin

    The Alaska Marine Highway is taking reservations for October through April sailings. The schedule changed so the Matanuska can get new engines.
X