Congressman Young says newest House proposal going nowhere

Don Young Official photo

Congressman Don Young (R-Alaska). Official photo.

In Washington, the government shutdown continues with no resolution in sight.

Alaska Congressman Don Young says the latest House proposal is going nowhere. It would fund the government and raise the debt ceiling, but make changes to the Affordable Care Act.

Young believes a solution will come from the Senate. He predicts House Speaker John Boehner will put it up for a vote, and if that happens, Young says he’ll support it, despite objections from the right flank of the House Republicans.

“It’s not Boehner’s fault,” Young said. “I mean a lot of people blame the speaker but this is more than that.”

“This is a very large group of individuals who very frankly don’t want anything to pass and that’s what you have to deal with.”

Young also says the minute-by-minute news reporting makes this impasse tougher to resolve than budget battles in decades past.

“This is a case where we’re overexposed and it’s hard for people to back down,” he said. “Egos are involved in this, and yet they know there’s a problem.”

Among the casualties of the shutdown is the Bering Sea crab fishery. It was supposed to open Tuesday, but the federal workers who issue the annual permits are on furlough.

Young says he wants to change U.S. fisheries law to take that office out of the process in future years.

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