Largest Strike So Far By Fast-Food Workers Set For Thursday

Organizers say workers at fast-food restaurants in cities across the nation will walk off their jobs Thursday in what’s expected to be the largest such strike so far, The Associated Press writes.

As the wire service adds:

“Thursday’s planned walkouts follow a series of strikes that began last November in New York City, then spread to cities including Chicago, Detroit and Seattle. Workers say they want $15 an hour, which would be about $31,000 a year for full-time employees. That’s more than double the federal minimum wage, which many fast food workers make, of $7.25 an hour, or $15,000 a year.”

According to Reuters, “employees of McDonald’s Corp, Wendy’s Restaurants LLC, Burger King Worldwide Inc and others have pledged to walk off their jobs in 50 cities from Boston, Mass., to Alameda, Calif., organizers say. They are expected to be joined by retail employees at stores owned by Macy’s Inc., Sears Holdings Corp. and Dollar Tree Inc. in some cities.”

Thursday on Morning Edition and on The Salt blog, NPR’s Jennifer Ludden reported about the struggle that many restaurant workers have to put food on their own tables.

Saru Jayaraman, co-founder and co-director of the worker advocacy group the Restaurant Opportunities Center, tells NPR that the cost of child care alone can eat up one-third of some restaurant workers’ incomes. She supports a bill to raise the minimum wage to just over $10.

But as Jennifer adds, “industry officials say a sharp increase in the minimum wage would kill jobs” by forcing some employers to cut positions.

Update at 9:40 a.m. ET. Protest In Manhattan:

The Associated Press writes that “in New York, about 300 to 400 protesters marched and flooded inside a McDonald’s near the Empire State Building. Shortly after the demonstration, however, the restaurant seemed to be operating normally and a few customers said they hadn’t heard of the movement. The same was true at a McDonald’s a few blocks away.”

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.
Read original article
Largest Strike So Far By Fast-Food Workers Set For Thursday

Recent headlines

  • Alaska Native Sisterhood members march in Wrangell during the Grand Camp's 2015 Convention in Wrangell. (Photo Courtesy Peter Naoroz/ANB)

    Brotherhood, Sisterhood prep for convention

    Alaska’s oldest Native organizations are trying to attract younger members. That and other issues are on the table at the ANB-ANS Grand Camp Convention Oct. 5-8.
  • The Explorer of the Seas docked in Skagway. (Photo by Emily Files/KHNS)

    Skagway tourism season comes to a close

    As the air gets colder and the days shorter, the Skagway tourism season is coming to a close. Overall, tourism staff says this summer was a success. The last cruise ship of the season has come and gone and shop owners around Skagway are preparing for winter, cleaning up and closing their doors. The streets that were recently busy with visitors are quieting down.
  • A satellite view of Western Alaska and the Bering Strait, taken Feb. 4, 2014. (Photo by NASA)

    Will Obama look north for his legacy?

    These are the days when a president turns to thoughts of legacy. As the months tick down on this Administration, President Obama has created a marine national monument off new England and last month vastly expanded one near Hawaii. Alaska interest groups are working to get his attention, too. Some want him to take bold action in the 49th State before he leaves office, and others are urging him to resist those calls.
  • Homer Electric Asssociation holds an informational meeting in Homer on September 28, 2016. (Photo by Shahla Farzan/KBBI)

    Homer residents question association deregulation

    Homer Electric Association held an informational meeting on September 28 to answer questions about the upcoming vote on deregulation. The meeting, which was held at Islands and Ocean Visitor Center, attracted more than 100 people. The overwhelming majority were HEA customers who expressed concerns about the consequences of deregulation.

Comments

Playing Now: