Barrage Of Car Bombings Kills Dozens In Iraq

More than a dozen car bombs exploded in Iraq early Monday, killing more than 50 people in Baghdad and other areas. At least 10 explosions were reported in the Iraqi capital during the morning rush hour.

Monday’s bombings wounded more than 100 people, the BBC reports.

“Police and medical sources said the attacks, which appeared to be coordinated, were concentrated on towns and cities in Iraq’s predominantly Shi’ite south,” Reuters reports, “and districts of the capital where Shi’ites reside.”

The latest outburst of violence that has seen clashes between Iraq’s Sunni and Shiite Muslims led U.N. envoy to Iraq Gyorgy Busztin to call for the killing to stop.

“I am deeply concerned about the heightened level of violence which carries the danger that the country falls back into sectarian strife,” Busztin said. “Iraq is bleeding from random violence, which sadly reached record heights during the Holy month of Ramadan.”

While reliable statistics of deaths in Iraq are difficult to tally, the U.N. puts the toll of violence in the country in July at more than 700 deaths, according to the BBC.

The attacks have not decreased during the ongoing Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

The month of fasting, in which many people gather in the early evening to dine and socialize, has presented militants with an opportunity to attack groups. A recent article by Agence France-Presse notes that cafes are reporting a steep drop in business, a loss that they blame on the violence.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.
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Barrage Of Car Bombings Kills Dozens In Iraq

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