FAA ups qualification requirement for First Officers

Commercial carriers have had a couple years to prepare for the change in requirements.

Commercial carriers have had a couple years to prepare for the change in requirements. (Photo by Tom Doyle/Flickr Creative Commons)

The Federal Aviation Administration is increasing the amount of hours required to become a copilot for a commercial air carrier.

The change goes into effect August 1.

Copilots – technically known as first officers – will now be required to hold an air transport pilot license.

It will take 1,500 hours to qualify for that. And that’s quite the increase – up from today’s standard, 250 hours.

“That doesn’t mean your first officer only had 250 hours,”  Matthew Macri, the director of operations for PenAir, said.

He says most first officers have well-exceeded the 250 hour mark, and the change won’t be too onerous.

“We’ve known this has been coming long enough that for the past two years most carriers have been able to adapt their hiring practices so it wouldn’t be a catastrophic event where they’d have to furlough half of their crew force until they have enough flight time,” Macri said.

Congress mandated the FAA change the requirements after a regional carrier in the northeast crashed killing 50 people. The FAA blamed a lack of pilot training in that crash.

Recent headlines

  • Cameron Brockett and Taylor Vidic of The Quaintrelles perform their song "Rolling Stone" live at the Alaskan Hotel during the 2017 Alaska Folk Folk Festival. (Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO) Cameron Brockett and Taylor Vidic of The Quaintrelles perform their song "Rolling Stone" live at the Alaskan Hotel during the 2017 Alaska Folk Folk Festival. (Photo by Annie Bartholomew/KTOO)

    Red Carpet Concert: The Quaintrelles

    Juneau musicians Taylor Vidic and Cameron Brockett perform their song "Rolling Stone" during the Alaska Folk Fest Red Carpet Concert
  • 220 Anchorage teachers receive layoff notices

    The pink slips, in all 220, were issued as legislators contend with a $2.5 billion budget deficit, leaving education funding levels for the coming year uncertain.
  • GCI Antenna

    Many GCI customers will see internet bills go up

    Many customers of Alaska telecommunications company GCI will see the cost of their internet service increase next month. Rates for what GCI calls its “No Worries” plan will increase 7 percent to 12 percent. That’s roughly $5 to $10 a month.
  • NTSB investigating helicopter crash on Herbert Glacier

    The National Transportation Safety Board is investigating how and why a Juneau-bound helicopter ferrying tourists crashed during a glacier excursion. The pilot and six tourists were treated and released at Juneau's hospital with minor injuries.
X