State seeks input on road, ferry, trail improvement list

Brotherhood Bridge, photo by Mike Knapp

Juneau’s Brotherhood Bridge is on a statewide transportation improvement project list with a higher price than before. Photo courtesy Mike Knapp.

A bike path in Saxman, a bridge replacement in Juneau and trail improvements in Sitka are on the list of federally-funded transportation projects for Southeast Alaska.

The state just announced it’s seeking public input into the latest version of the list. Dozens of projects from around the state are also included.

Peter Christensen is the Department of Transportation’s capital improvement program manager.

“STIP is an acronym. It’s S-T-I-P, Statewide Transportation Improvement Program. And it is a federal requirement that we have a list of projects that we intend to work on with federal funds and that the public be able to see that list, comment on it and give us feedback, Christensen said.

The four-year list also includes improving Petersburg’s Nordic Drive, upgrading 6 miles of Kake logging road, and repaving much of Juneau’s Egan Drive.

Christensen said the list is a living document that undergoes frequent change.

“Some projects are able to accelerate and go faster. Some projects might have encountered additional issues in the environmental phase, so they need to be investigated further,” Christensen said.

“We can have trouble purchasing right of way, so the project gets hung up there for a little while. A number of things can happen to slow up a project and a number of things can go right or smoothly to accelerate it,” he added.

For example, the list shows Juneau’s Brotherhood Bridge replacement will cost about $8.5 million more than expected. The total estimate is now $30 million.

Comments are being taken through August 5th.

View the list.

Use an interactive map to find projects in your community.

Visit the state STIP page, to read more about the projects list.

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