Coast Guard helps deploy seismic sensors

U.S. Geological Survey scientists aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Maple prepare an ocean-bottom seismometer for deployment along the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault northwest of Craig, Alaska, April 26, 2013. The team placed the equipment along a 28-mile section of the fault to improve understanding of recent earthquake activity in the region. (U.S. Geological Survey photo by Emily Roland)

U.S. Geological Survey scientists aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Maple prepare an ocean-bottom seismometer for deployment along the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault northwest of Craig, Alaska, April 26, 2013. The team placed the equipment along a 28-mile section of the fault to improve understanding of recent earthquake activity in the region. (U.S. Geological Survey photo by Emily Roland)

The U.S. Coast Guard recently helped placed seismic sensors along a fault near Craig in southeast Alaska.

Crew from the cutter Maple worked with U.S. Geological Survey scientists to deploy 12 seismic sensors along a 28-mile section of the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault last week.

The Coast Guard, in a news release, says the seismometers are meant to improve the understanding of recent earthquake activity and related hazards that affect coastal communities in the region.

Peter Haeussler, a USGS research geologist, says the fault is similar to the northern San Andreas fault but located entirely offshore, making it harder to study.

The Coast Guard says the cutter has all the equipment on board necessary to handle large equipment, like the sensors.

The instruments are expected to be recovered next month.