‘It Felt Like An Earthquake’: One Still Missing After Kansas City Explosion

By February 20, 2013NPR News
Fire fighters and utility workers at the scene of a massive gas explosion and fire Tuesday night in Kansas City, Mo. Orlin Wagner/AP

Fire fighters and utility workers at the scene of a massive gas explosion and fire Tuesday night in Kansas City, Mo. Orlin Wagner/AP

“It sounded like thunder, but it felt like an earthquake,” Tracey Truitt, a lawyer who was working in a nearby building, tells the Kansas City Star about an explosion Tuesday evening that leveled a restaurant in the city’s Country Club Plaza.

At least 16 people were injured and as of early this morning one person remained missing, the Star says.

Our colleagues at KCUR report that “Missouri Gas Energy released a statement Tuesday night regarding the fire, saying: ‘Early indications are that a contractor doing underground work struck a natural gas line, but the investigation continues.’ ”

According to the Star, the blast happened at JJ’s restaurant shortly after 6 p.m. local time. “The force knocked out windows at least a half-block away and was felt nearly a mile away. Flames soared two-thirds higher than the building into the evening sky. Bricks and broken glass were strewn around.”

KCUR says that a strong gas odor had been reported before the explosion, and that customers had been evacuated from the restaurant. It adds that:

“The initial blast was felt at least 5 blocks away and shattered windows in the block adjacent to the restaurant. The restaurant building is for practical purposes destroyed — the roof caved in.”

 

Read original article

‘It Felt Like An Earthquake’: One Still Missing After Kansas City Explosion

Recent headlines

  • dollar bill money macro

    Per diems driving special session costs

    Lawmakers who represent areas outside Juneau receive $295 for each day of the special session. Juneau lawmakers receive $221.25 per day.
  • Caroline Hoover proudly pins an Alaska Territorial Guard medal on the front of her father's parka during an official discharge ceremony held Oct. 17 in Kipnuk, Alaska. David Martin is one of three surviving members of the Alaska Territorial Guard's Kipnuk unit. A total of 59 residents of Kipnuk, who volunteered to defend Alaska in the event of a Japanese invasion during World War II, were recognized during the ceremony. Kipnuk residents who served with the Alaska Territorial Guard from 1942-1947 were members of a U.S. Army component organized in response to attacks by the Japanese on Pearl Harbor. (Photo by Jerry Walton, Department of Military and Veterans Affairs cultural resource manager and native liaison/public domain/Wikimedia Commons)

    16 Alaska Territorial Guard vets to be honored in Anchorage

    Sixteen veterans of the Alaska Territorial Guard will be honored at a discharge ceremony today. Four of them are from Western Alaska.
  • Don Andrew Roguska looks out from an upstairs window of an historic Juneau house he bought in 2016 to restore. Zoning regulations have prevented him from rebuilding in the same style. (Photo by Jacob Resneck/KTOO)

    Juneau mulls relaxing zoning rules for historic houses

    The historic houses in Juneau and Douglas were predominately built by miners and fishermen long before today's zoning was put into place. That's prevented homeowners from restoring or rebuilding homes in these neighborhoods without running into conflict with the city's zoning laws -- a temporary fix may be on the way.
  • Young joins Afghanistan war skeptics in Congress

    Alaska U.S. Rep. Don Young wants to know why Americans are still fighting in Afghanistan. He has co-sponsored a bill that would end funding for the war in a year, unless the president and Congress affirm the need for it.
X