Huge Bomb In Pakistani Market Kills Dozens

By February 17, 2013NPR News
Rescue teams attend the bodies of victims who died in a marketplace bomb blast in Quetta, Pakistan, on Saturday. Banaras Khan/AFP/Getty

Rescue teams attend the bodies of victims who died in a marketplace bomb blast in Quetta, Pakistan, on Saturday. Banaras Khan/AFP/Getty

There’s been another horrifying bombing in Quetta, Pakistan; reports say at least 47 people are dead after an explosive device went off in a crowded marketplace. At least 130 people are hurt, notes Reuters. Photos from the scene show heavy smoke rising over buildings.

Pakistani news outlet, Dawn, cites Quetta senior police official Wazir Khan Nasir, who says the bomb appeared to target Shiite Muslims because of the neighborhood the attackers picked. Most of the victims are women and children who were shopping for vegetables.

After the blast, enraged residents formed a huge crowd, and police and rescue workers couldn’t initially get through to victims. The bomb was stashed on a motorcycle and parked next to a building; the building partially collapsed after the explosion, and there are reports that some people were trapped inside.

According to The Associated Press, there have been several attacks against Shiite Pakistanis in Baluchistan province, of which Quetta is the capital, over the past several months. There are militant groups active in the region.

On Jan. 10, attackers targeting the Shiite community in Quetta carried out two separate bombings, killing at least 119 people and wounding 121, according to the BBC. Relatives of the victims were so angry they would not bury their dead until they got promises of better security from provincial officials.

 

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Huge Bomb In Pakistani Market Kills Dozens

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